The Newtons Of Old Park View (Our Present Past 4)

[ To get caught up on this story – OUR PRESENT PAST – CLICK HERE   FOR PART 1 /  CLICK HERE FOR PART 2 /   CLICK HERE  FOR PART 3 ] 

  …     …     …     …     …     …     …     …     …     …      …     …     …     …     …     …     …     …     …     …     .

 

Charles MacArthur Thambithurai Newton was a fine-looking fellow, a dapper dresser, impeccably turned out at all times.  His appreciation of quality clothing and polished footwear was legend.  

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Young Charles Newton (standing left) and his buddies. ‘Westernised Oriental Gentlemen’, all dressed to the nines in colonial finery.  Circa 1920s. (Courtesy Eric Perinpanayagam)

 

The son of Gladwin Ponniah and Victoria Nesamma Newton of Puloly West, young Charles commenced his career as an assistant teacher at his alma mater, St John’s College, Chundikuli (Jaffna).   Charming and youthful, he became popular with the students and well respected by fellow members of staff.  Charles, who possessed a scholarly knowledge of the Tamil language, was an acknowledged pundit among his peers.  

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Staff of St John’s College, Chundikuli (circa 1930’s).  Cbarles Newton in ‘national cosume’,  seated third from left.  Principal, Father Peto (a British Anglican minister), seated centre right.
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St John’s College, Chundikuli, as it stands today, renovated and rebuilt after the civil war.  (Picture taken by this writer in 2017)

 

Young Mr. Newton of St John’s College was also known for his love of English drama and lent his wholehearted support to the school’s theatrical endeavours.  

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Photo of a scene from a Shakespearean production staged at Chundikuli Girls’ College in 1912, published in the school magazine.  (The original magazines are all accessible in the school library.)  The standard of education provided in the missions schools in northern Ceylon was very high.  English was taught as to native speakers of the language. Chundikuli Girls’ College is the sister school of St. John’s College.  The two institutions are  a stone’s throw away from each other.  (Photo taken by this writer 2017)

 There came that inevitable moment in this young man’s life — as in the lives of all young men for generations before and after him — when his elders commenced discussions on his matrimonial prospects and the family matchmakers began screening potential candidates. The young lady presented for his consideration was Miss Anne Rose Thangamma Perinpanayagam, daughter of  a wealthy landowner, Joshua Perinpanayagam of Perinpanayagam Lane.   Miss Anne Rose’s hand was backed by the gleaming promise of a substantial dowry. 

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Joshua Perinpanayagam’s great grand children standing at the entrance to Perinpanayagam Lane, Chundikuli.  Left to right:  Suhanthi, Indramathy and Indranath, children of his grandson, Barnabas Albert Thambirajah Perinpanayagam (Courtesy Suhanthi Knower)

The dashing dandy, Charles Newton,  was permitted a glimpse of the wife-in-waiting before he agreed to the nuptials. Miss Anne Rose sat demurely in her chair, directly beside her brother, Samuel Alfred Perinpanayagam’s wife.  Her sister-in-law, Rebecca Ponnamma (Danvers)  Perinpanayagam was a tall, pretty lady of striking appearance.  Charles, who did a walk-by and was allowed to take a quick look from a distance away, assumed that the attractive young matron, Rebecca Ponnamma, was the proposed bride-to-be.   

 

He  declared a definite, delighted, “Yes!”    

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Mistaken identity:  Anne Rose Thangamma (Perinpanayagam) Newton in her later years, circa 1950’s (courtesy Daniel Newton)
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and her brother’s wife –  Rebecca Ponnamma (Danvers) Perinpanayagam with her oldest          grandchild, Eric. Circa 1930’s.  (Courtesy Eric Perinpanayagam)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So the match was made, the details decided on.  The date was set. The next time Charles Newton set eyes on the woman he’d pledged to marry was at the altar at St John’s church in Chundikuli, as she walked up the aisle on her father’s arm.                 

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St John the Baptist Church (known as St John’s), Chundikuli, the stage for family weddings over several generations, rebuilt and modernized after the civil war (2017).

He was perturbed to note the stature of the veiled bride.  She appeared much shorter than he remembered.  Then, when guazy fabric was moved aside to enable the bridegroom to secure the traditional marriage thali around his bride’s neck, he observed that her skin was some shades darker than his recollection served him.  

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The thali is a rope of solid 24 carat gold that the Tamil groom places around the neck of the bride.  It has the same significance as the wedding ring.  The screws in the shape of clasped hands, once put in place at the altar by the bridegroom, are traditionally never undone.  In the old days several gold sovereigns were affixed to the necklace.  This was the woman’s wealth and her insurance in case of unexpected widowhood. The symbols on the Hindu and Christian thalis differ. (The thali in the picture with a Bible, a cross and an angel engraved on it, a smaller, simpler version of the traditional thali, belongs to this writer.  It was placed around her neck by her husband on her wedding day.)

 

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A solid rope of gold (the lower necklace) – the thali worn by this writer’s husband’s great grandmother (circa 1900s)

                                                                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                             Too late for second thoughts …

They exchanged their vows and Charles MacArthur Thambithurai Newton and Anne Rose Thangamma Perinpanayagam entered the state of Holy Matrimony.  The pair were now man and wife. 

Oral family history recalls that the disgruntled new husband made no effort to hide his dissatisfaction.

“In those days, there were no honeymoons,” an elderly great-niece-by-marriage chuckles as she remembers the story her mother told her.  “They went straight home and were sent to their room.  He ignored her completely. The relatives had to intervene.  They told him it was too late to do anything now that the wedding was over.  They advised him to make the best of the situation.”

Her eyes gleam with amusement.  “They set the stage when he walked by.  He was tricked into agreeing to the marriage …”

Posterity will never find out who the culpable ‘they’ might be …

The circumstances surrounding the nuptials of this theatre-loving thespian was comic drama worthy of Oscar Wilde and others whose plays his students performed on the stage of his beloved school, St John’s College.

“What to do?” as the local saying goes — which really means … there’s no solution to the situation, so grin and bear it!

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A wedding photo taken outside St John’s Church, circa 1920’s.  This writer located the picture in the library of Chundikuli Girls’ College,  in an original copy of the school magazine from the 20’s/30’s (2017)

 Despite the inauspicious commencement to the marriage, the couple eased into a life of domestic comfort, although history doesn’t remember Anne Rose Newton as being a lady of exceptionally cheerful disposition.

In addition to several acres of paddy land that was part of her dowry, Joshua Perinpanayagam, Anne Rose’s father, presented his daughter with a handsome property in Forest Office Lane in the fashionable Jaffna suburb of Chundikuli. 

The neighbouring block of land was given by Joshua to his son, Samuel Alfred Chellathurai (Anne Rose’s brother, who married the pretty Rebecca Ponnamma Danvers).

At a time when homes were constructed of wattle-and-daub and coconut thatch, old Joshua Perinpanayagam, they say, built the first brick-and-tile residence in Jaffna – such was the vast extent of his wealth.   

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The entrance to Forest Office Lane (2017) (photo taken by this writer)
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A wattle-and-daub, coconut thatch building typical of the time (circa 1900’s)

 

 

 

 

Chundikuli, in the early nineteen hundreds, boasted modern homes with flower gardens and shady trees, built in the Dutch and colonial styles and was where the residence of the British Government Agent was situated. It was the posh part of town.  

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Old Dutch houses in Jaffna town, circa 1900’s
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War-damaged colonial home in Tellipalai (2017) (Photo taken by this writer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Government Rest House, Jaffna (circa 1900)

Charles Newton built Old Park View on his wife’s dowry property.  It was a few minutes’ walk from Old Park, St John’s College and Chundikuli Girls’ College.  

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Old Park, Chundikuli, as it stands today.  The colonial Government Agent’s residence, known as the Kachcheri, was built on these sprawling grounds which he named Old Park.  He later opened the park to the public (photo taken by this writer, 2017)
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A child’s thoughts on Old Park, from the Chundikuli Girls’ College magazine, circa 1930s.  The old magazines, many falling apart, are accessible at the school library. (Photo taken by this writer, 2017)

 

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An artist’s view of the Kachcheri (the colonial Government Agent’s residence) in all its original grandeur.

 

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The ruins of the grand old Kachcheri, the Government Agent’s residence, bombed during the civil war. (Photo taken by this writer, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Newton was placed in charge of a satellite school of St John’s College in Urumbrai, which was later consolidated with the main school in Chundikuli. He also served as the college bursar.

Charles was a gregarious man.  He adored company.  Married to a woman who was famed as a great cook, he made every occasion an excuse for a party. Old Park View was a place of regular entertainment and his guests often received a gift at the end of an evening of jollification at his residence.  He marked the milestone of his fiftieth birthday with a special handkerchief that he presented to every gentleman who attended the celebration.

Charles was fond of animals and set up a mini zoo in the large grounds surrounding his house, with iron cages housing deer, peacocks and exotic birds.  Tales are told of Charles’ talking parrot and the pet squirrel who slept in his bed at night and answered to the name of Ganapathy.  (One sad morning the squirrel was found dead. The creature’s life was snuffed out when his sleeping master rolled over him.)

RIP little Ganapathy …

Charles delighted in agrarian pursuits and had dreams of planting every variety of fruit tree native to the island of Ceylon in the orchard around his home.  The juicy karuththa kolumban mangoes harvested on this property were, in later years, carefully boxed by Anne Rose and dispatched by overnight train to the grandchildren in Colombo.

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Typical wattle-and-daub and cadjan (coconut-thatch) homes in old Jaffna (circa 1900s)
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A shady, palm-lined lane in northern Ceylon, with an approaching bullock-drawn carriage (circa 1900’s)

Charles and Anne Rose Thangamma Newton had four children — two daughters and two sons — Grace Nesaratnam, Mercy Sugirtharatnam, Victor Joseph Jeyaratnam and Arthur Samuel Selvaratnam.  

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The Newtons of Old Park View, circa 1930s.  Left to right (seated):  Grace Nesaratnam (Newton) Aiyadore (expecting her first baby), Charles Newton, Anne Rose Thangamma (Perinpanayagam) Newton, Mercy Sugirtharatnam (Newton) Samuel (expecting her third child).  Standing: Victor Joseph Jeyaratnam (Newton).  Seated on the ground: Arthur Samuel Selvaratnam (Newton).  On Grandpa Charles’ lap: Ruby Ratnadevi , With Grandma’s arm on her: Pearl Ratnaranee (daughters of Mercy Sugirtharatnam) (Courtesy Rowena Landham)
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(2) Mercy Sugirtharatnam (Newton) Samuel (circa 1930’s)
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(1) Grace Nesaratnam (Newton) Aiyadore , circa 1960’s (Courtesy Ranji Ratnasingham)

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

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(4) Arthur Samuel  Selvaratnam Newton, circa 1950’s (courtesy Daniel Newton)
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(3) Victor Joseph Jeyaratnam (Newton)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After the solemnization of the union between Charles and Anne Rose Thangamma, a marriage was arranged between Anne Rose’s brother, Joseph Alfred Thambirasa Perinpanayagam, and Charles’ sister, Jane Ponnamma Newton. These unions were termed inter-marriages, where a brother and sister were married to a brother and sister of another family. Such marriages forged strong family ties, lessened the pressure of dowry demands and kept property and wealth within clans.  

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Jane Ponnamma (Newton) Perinpanayagam (Charles Newton’s sister) with her husband, Joseph Alfred Thambirasa Perinpanayagam (Anne Rose Thangamma’s brother) and their only child, Barnabas Albert  Thambirajah, circa 1924 (courtesy Eric Perinpanayagam)

 

And now … what of Shadrak?   Remember him?

To the Newton household at Old Park View, for a short while in the early years of their marriage, so the story goes, came Shadrak Samuel, the young orphan from Vavuniya.  Anne Rose Thangamma (Perinpanayagam) Newton was Shadrak’s late mother’s first cousin. Her sister-in-law, Rebecca Ponnamma (Danvers) Perinpanayagam, was his aunt (his mother’s sister) who welcomed him into her home where he lived in the capital city of Colombo. 

Shadrak and his two brothers had been sent to Jaffna to be educated as wards of the Anglican Church.  The boys were fostered by various relatives while being schooled at Saint John’s college.  Shadrak was twelve years old when he made the bold, independent decision to terminate his formal education and take the long journey from the northern province to the south of the island of Ceylon, to seek his fortune and help support his siblings.   He might have been on a visit from Colombo some years later when the second Newton daughter, Mercy, was born.  The teen-aged Shadrak is reported to have held the infant in his arms.  

He would have been sixteen years old.  

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Charles Newton in the St John’s College Magazine.  This picture was included with his death announcemnt (1936) (Photo taken by this writer in 2017)
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The original copies of the St John’s College magazine are still available in the school library.  This writer found the photo of Charles Newton, her great grandfather, in the 1936 magazine from the bound compilation above.

 

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 Charles Newton memorial plaque in the St John’s College library. (Photo taken by this writer, 2017)
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Portrait of Dr. E. S. Thevasagayam, hanging at St John’s College in the gallery of former principals. Dr. Thevasagayam was the husband of Daisy, Charles Newton’s granddaughter, whose mother was Charles’ daughter, Grace Nesaratnam Aiyadore. Dr.  Thevasagayam, after retiring from a career in the UN, took up the postion of principal of St John’s College during the difficult civil war years.  He was a former student of the school.

 

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Handwritten burial records in the vestry of St John’s Church, Chundikuli, by means of which this writer was able to locate graves of ancestors.  Many records were lost when the church was bombed during the civil war.  There appeared to be no plans towards digitizing when this picture was taken by the writer in 2017.

                                                           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                  To be continued …      

   [ Click here  to read Part 4: The Newtons Of Old Park View. ]     

(Scroll down for details of geneologies and more pictures)       

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Geneologies of the Danvers / Perinpanayagam/  Newton / Samuel family lines —

(These geneologies were put together using notes from the archives of the late S.E.R. Perinpanaygam, courtesy Eric and Tim Perinpanayagam)

 

The family tree gets complex and tangled with several marriages within the Danvers, Perinpanayagam, Newton and Samuel lines. This writer created a detective-style board to unravel the convolutions …
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Helen Nesamma (Newton) Karthigesu (Charles Newton’s sister), and her husband, Sinnathamby Solomon Karthigesu (courtesy Charles Manickam)

 

 

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Danvers Family Line –

Kanthar married Thangam (circa 1790) and settled in Tellippalai.  They had 4 children. One son, Kathirgamar Danvers (b. 1809) graduated from the Tellipallai English boarding school and the converted to  the Christian faith in 1834.  

 

Kathirgamar Danvers fled to Pandeterruppu after the villagers, angry that he had turned away from his Hindu beliefs, burned down the Tellipallai Church.  The American missionary, Rev. Daniel Poor, arranged a marriage for him with Anna Saveriyal of Pandeterruppu, a student at Uduvil Girls’ School.

Kathirgamar and Anna Danvers had seven children – David, Jane Elizabeth, Daniel, Gabriel, Samuel, Solomon and Joseph.  

 

Their son, David Danvers, married Harriet Theivanei. Their daughter, Jane Elizabeth Danvers married Joshua Perinpanayagam (b. 1837) Their son, Solomon Danvers, married Thangam Vethanayagam (sister of Vethanyagam Subramaniam Samuel)  

 

The tomb of the missionary, Rev. Daniel Poor, in the Tellipalai Church yard.  (Photo taken by this writer, 2017)
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Plaque at the door of the Tellipalai Church (taken by this writer in 2017)

 

The American Missions Church in Tellipalai, rebuilt after the civil war. This was the church that was burned down in reaction to Kathirgarmar Danvers’ conversion to Christianity in 1834.  Plaque (as in picture above left) by the door. (Picture taken by this writer, 2017)
The refurbished tombs of the early American missionaries in the Tellipalai Church yard. (Picture taken by this writer, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Danvers and Harriet Theivanei had three daughters – Mary Chellamma, Elizabeth Annamma and Rebecca Ponnamma.  

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Mary Chellamma Danvers married Vethanayagam Subramaniam Samuel. (Solomon Danvers, Mary’s uncle, married  Thangam Vethanayagam, her husband’s sister. Her uncle her became her brother-in-law.)

Rebecca Ponnamma Danvers married her cousin, Samuel Alfred Perinpanayagam.

Elizabeth Annamma Danvers married Jacob Arumainayagam.  

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Geneology records from the Bible of Kathirgamar Davers’ great grandson, Solomon Chinnathamby Samuel.  This Bible survived war and immigration (courtesy Renee Jogananthan)

 

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Perinpanayagam Family Line –

Joshua Perinpanayagam married Jane Elizabeth Danvers (daughter of Kathirgamar Danvers, sister of David Danvers).

They had 2 sons and a daughter — Samuel Alfred Chellathurai (b. 1892), Anne Rose Thangamma and Joseph Albert Thambirasa (b. 1879)  

 

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Jane Ponnamma (Newton) Perinpanayagam (Charles Newton’s sister) with her husband, Joseph Alfred Thambirasa Perinpanayagam (Grandson of Joshua Perinpanayagam) in their latter years (circa 1960’s) (courtesy Suhanthi Knower)

 

Samuel Alfred Chellathurai Perinpanayagam married Rebecca Ponnamma Danvers.

Anne Rose Thangamma married Charles MacArthur Thambithurai Newton (b. 1883).

Joseph Albert Thamirasa (b. 1879) married Jane Ponnamma Newton (sister of Charles Newton).          

 

 

 

 

Samuel Alfred Perinpanayagam and Rebecca Danvers had three sons – Stephen Edgar Rasasingham (b. 1908), Donald Edwin Balasingham (b. 1909) and George Walter Kulasingham (b. 1912).  Donald died in infancy. Their adopted daughter, Anna May Gnanamanie died in her teens.  

 

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Samuel Family Line –

   

Vethanayagam (from Kaithady) married Seeniachchi (from Urumpirai).  They had 9 children – 6 daughters and 3 sons.

Their son, Vethanayagam Subramaniam Samuel married Mary Chellamma Danvers.

Their daughter, Thangam Vethanayagam married Solomon Danvers (Mary Chellamma Danvers’ paternal uncle).  

 

Vethanayagam Subramaniam Samuel and Mary Chellamma Danvers settled in Vavuniya.

They had 6 children – 3 sons and 3 daughters – (1) Sarah Chinnamma, (2) Subramaniam Vethanayagam Chelliah, (3) Shadrak Chinniah, (4) Elizabeth Thangamma, (5) Anna Chinnathangam and (6) Solomon Chinnathamby.

Sara Chinnamma Samuel married David Sinniah Kanagaratnam.

Subramanian Vethanyagam Chelliah married Annam (neé?).

Shadrak Chinniah married Mercy Sugirtharatnam Newton.

Elizabeth Thangamma married Godwin Wesley Sittampalam.

Anna Chinnathangam married Albert Kathapoo.

Solomon Chinnathamby married Mercy Atputhanayagam Gnanaratnam.  

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More beautifully handwritten  records from the Bible of Kathirgamar Davers’ great grandson, Solomon Chinnathamby Samuel.  This Bible survived war and immigration (courtesy Renee Jogananthan, Solomon’s daughter)

Shadrak Chinniah Samuel married Mercy Sugirtharatnam Newton.

They had 6 children – (1) Pearl Ratnaranee, (2) Ruby Ratnadevi, (3) Peter Ratnarajah, (4) Daniel Ratnadeva, (5) Beatrice Ratnajothy and (6) Elizabeth Ratnamalar

A seventh child, Bertie, didn’t survive childhood.  

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Newton Family Line –

Gladwin Ponniah Newton (son of Robert Newton and his wife, a Miss Phillips) married Victoria Valliamma.

They had 6 children – (1) Charles MacArthur Thambithurai , (2) Jane Ponnamma (who married Joseph Albert Thambirasa Perinpanayagam), (3) Isaac Alagaiah, (4) Ranji , (5) Julia Rasamma and (6) Helen Nesamma .  

 

Charles MacArthur Thambithurai Newton married Anne Rose Thangamma Perinpanayagam.

They had 4 children – (1) Grace Nesaratnam, (2) Mercy Sugirtharatnam, (3) Victor Joseph Jeyaratnam and (4) Arthur Samuel Selvaratnam.

Grace Nesaratnam Newton married Muthuvelu Fred Aiyadore.

Mercy Sugirtharatnam married Shadrak Chinniah Samuel.

Victor Joseph Jeyaratnam Newton married Selvamalar Thayalam Arulampalam.

Arthur Samuel Selvaratnam married Thangam (née?)  

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The David the Sexton trying to locate our ancestors’ graves (photo taken by this writer, 2017)
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David, the Sexton of St John’s Church, Chundikulli, unlocking the gate to the little church graveyard (photo taken by this writer, 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The little cemetery in the St John’s churchyard where some of the ornate, Victorian-style tombs have been refurbished after the war, while others are disintegrating into crumbling mounds of rubble. On this site, the writer and her husband  discovered the graves of ancestors and others on their respective family trees –

 

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Native Christian pastors and preachers in Jaffna, circa 1917                    (courtesy Dr. R.P. Rajakone)

Anna Goes To School (Our Present Past 3)

[ To get caught up on this story Click here   for OUR PRESENT PAST (1) / CLICK HERE FOR OUR PRESENT PAST (2) ]

Pink streaks of dawn stained the sky when the overnight train from Jaffna ground to a halt at the Fort railway station in Colombo.  Clutching his small bag of belongings, the boy stepped out of his carriage, overwhelmed by the noise and bustle of the waking metropolis.  Aunt Rebecca Ponnamma was waiting on the platform, her husband — Uncle Samuel Alfred Perinpanayagam — at her side.  She waved to catch her nephew’s eye. Rebecca Ponnamma wrapped her arms around her dead sister’s boy and Shadrak heaved a quiet sigh of relief. This was his mother’s flesh and blood.  His own.   He was home.

Tramcars on York Street, in the bustling metropolis of Colombo, circa 1900’s. (Courtesy Google images).
Goodbye farming communities, wattle-and-daub abodes and coconut-thatch roofs in the rural the northern province of Jaffna … (Google images)

Rebecca Ponnamma Danvers was an intelligent young woman, as beautiful as she was bright.  She conversed fluently in English, a bright star at Uduvil Girls’ College where she was awarded a Queen’s Scholarship in 1901 when she obtained her Calcutta University Matriculation Certificate.  

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Woman beyond her time: born in 1876, Rebecca Ponnamma Danvers (far left), with classmates (courtesy Eric Perinpanayagam)
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Uduvil Girls School founded by the CMS Anglican Missonaries in Jan. 1824, the first girls’ boarding school established in Asia.
A senior class at Uduvil Girls’ School, circa early 1900’s (Courtesy Tishan Mills, ceylontamils.com)

School teacher, evangelist, lifelong friend and ally of Dr. Mary Rutnam, Rebecca Ponnamma Danvers was a woman beyond her time.

Dr Mary Rutnam (1873-1962), a Canadian pioneer, physician, philanthropist and political activist, came to Ceylon in 1896. She was rejected as a missionary doctor because of her marriage to a Ceylonese Tamil man. In defiance of missionary and colonial society, she remained in Ceylon and worked for the government.

In 1904 Rebecca married Samuel Alfred Chellathurai Perinpanayagam who was a first cousin.  They were both grandchildren of Kadirgamar and Harriet (Theivenei)  Danvers.  (Kadirgamar Danvers was the first in the family line to convert to Christianity). The couple moved to Colombo where Samuel Alfred was employed by the British firm, Messrs Boustead Brothers.  They settled in the then fashionable suburb of Kotahena, where they purchased a home in Silversmith Street (now Bandaranaike Mawatha)

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Samuel Alfred and Rebecca Ponnamma (Danvers) Perinpanayagam, grandly attired in colonial finery.

 

 

 

Shadrak found shelter in the kind maternal presence of his aunt and was happy in the home in Kotahena.  Barely into his teens, the boy was apprenticed to the British firm, Hoare and Company.  Here he was initiated into the hardware business.  The job called for hard manual labour and his duties often included heaving heavy bags around on his back.    Young though he was, and now a cog in the wheel of big city life, Shadrak never gave up the daily discipline of a quiet early morning time alone in prayer and scripture-reading.  He clung with steadfast determination to the early discipline of  his grandmother’s teaching, From time to time he paused to open the twelfth-birthday letter from his granny to refresh his memory and savour the words of the blessing scrawled in Tamil script. Continue reading “Anna Goes To School (Our Present Past 3)”